My Thoughts On A Watering System

Introduction:

With a rather large collection of African Violets to take care I had to come up with a faster means of water than the standard little one gallon watering can. I can not take credit for being the originator of this idea it has been around for sometime I am just going to show and explain my version of it. It is a rather simple setup consisting of a

  1. water storage tank
  2. water pump
  3. water hose
  4. watering wand
  5. system update

Sounds simple doesn't it, let us take a look at the parts individually. As always click on the links to see photos.

The storage tank can be just about anything that you have room for or have on hand. A road to the wise use as large a storage tank as you possibly can or else you will be spending more time filling the tanks than anything. The storage tank that I am using holds about 14 gallon and needs to be bigger, some day it will be. The main think goes without saying it needs to be leak proof. Here is a photo of my water storage tank

The pump is the main and most expensive part. The best advice here is to buy the biggest and best that you can buy. The pump that I am using seems to do the job rather nicely, it is a pool pump that can be submerged. I found my pool pump at Home Depot but most any garden center carries them especially during the spring and summer season. Please do not try to get buy with a small inexpensive one you are just wasting your money, they will not pump any amount of water for any distance. The pump that I use is rated at 1200 gallons per hour sounds like a lot but that volume is needed to have enough force to pump the water to the top shelf. If you would like to take a look at the pump that I am using, here you go one pond pump coming up.

This is also a fairly easy item to come up with. The hose can be almost anything that will transport the water. One word of caution though do not buy a clear hose, algae just loves to grow in it. I learned the hard way. I am currently using a 25 foot section of garden hose be sure and buy a very flexible hose, it will be easier to move around and coil up for storage. I have a friend that managed to find a hose that curls up on its own, and would you believe it, it is purple. She can always find something in purple, not me. The easiest way that I have found to connect the hose to the pump is to cut the end off and slip it over the outlet on the pump and secure it with a hose clamp.

This is perhaps the hardest part of the whole setup to find. If you are lucky you can find a wand that suits your purpose without having to do any fancy constructing. One solution is to possibly use a replacement wand for one of the weed sprayers, but please stay away from the plastic ones they bend. I tried one and it just did not suit my wants and setup. I ended up visiting the local home improvement center and was able to find several parts that I could put together to make one that I am very satisfied with. To start with I selected a garden watering nozzle (get a good one so it won't leak) in the plumbing department I found a piece of small diameter chrome plated pipe (supposed to be used in plumbing sinks). In order to connect it to the garden nose I was able to find a fitting in the plumbing department that allowed me to secure that pipe to the end of the garden nozzle. Once it was all connected together I carefully put a slight bend in the end of the pipe. My finished watering wand The only thing remaining to do was to connect the nozzle to hose and the hose to the pump.

I have since changed my whole wand setup, but I left up these directions for the ones that might like to go this route. I now use a nozzel that used to be sold by rabbit raising product supplies. The nozzel was chrome plated and had a rubber tip that I just cut off and was able to insert the wand into. While surfing for information on orchids I notice a few suppliers that had water wands for sell so that might be a source.

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